Announcing the People, Place and Power Series at The Commonwealth Club

This is a pivotal time in the Bay Area and across the nation. Conversations are happening at every level about the future of our region, about who can live and thrive here. What jobs are being created locally and who is prepared for them? How do we ensure affordable housing for current and new residents? Who can be a part of the prosperity of the booming economy of the region?

We have launched a new regional agenda and are teaming up with the Commonwealth Club on a series to explore the intersection of People, Place and Power in the Bay Area. 

Check out the conversations we have had. We will continue to post information about upcoming panelists and sessions on this page, as well as video following the events.

LogoLockUp_BayAreaLeads_Web

This series and our partnership with the Commonwealth Club is made possible by the support of Bay Area Leads donors.


Not on Our Watch: How the Bay Area Stands United

June 26, 2017

Teenage brothers Angel and Miguel worry every day about their mom. She is undocumented, and she’s put together an emergency binder telling her sons what to do if she’s picked up by immigration authorities and doesn’t come home. Kaushik came to San Francisco from India five years ago to attend college. He found a job as an app engineer, but because he’s here on a specialized work visa, he isn’t sure if he can continue living in this country. Esra, a student at San Jose State University, must think about her safety when she gets dressed in the morning. Last year, a stranger tried to yank off her hijab while she was in a campus parking garage.

These real stories illustrate what is unfolding across the country and in Bay Area communities. Our panelists say that, unlike any other region, the Bay Area is equipped with the history and willpower to stand with and protect immigrants and their families at this time of crisis.

In January, San Francisco, a city led by the son of immigrants, became the first city in the country to sue the president for threatening to withhold federal funding from sanctuary cities. In February, Muslim artists began staging prayer sessions in public plazas throughout San Francisco to combat growing Islamophobia. In both February and April, more than 100 tech companies, including many founded by immigrants, banded together to file legal challenges to the president’s executive orders on immigration. And on May 1, tens of thousands of Bay Area residents took to the streets to demonstrate immigrants and workers’ essential contributions to society.Please join the San Francisco Foundation to hear from Bay Area leaders seeking to protect and defend immigrants (who represent more than 40 percent of Bay Area residents) so that they can continue to contribute to the economic prosperity and cultural vibrancy of the region.

Panelists
Ju Hong, Dreamer Activist
Marielena Hincapié, Executive Director, National Immigration Law Center
Zahra Billoo, Executive Director, Council on American-Islamic Relations
Raha Jorjani, Director of the Immigration Representation Unit, Alameda County Public Defender’s Office

Moderated by Mina Kim, Anchor and Host, KQED

Read the blog piece about this session.

Watch the video of this session:


Changemakers: Movement Leaders on Civil Rights in an Uncivil Time

February 1, 2017

2017Feb_CWCEvent_Promotion_Email_R3

Black Lives Matter. Immigrant rights. Climate justice. Are demands for change leading to lasting change? Are we rewriting the rules, or just arguing about them? How do movements — their leaders and their members — successfully build power and spur lasting change? What can we learn from leaders of recent efforts and from history? At a time of great disruption, join us as we continue our series on People, Place and Power with a discussion with movement leaders on building power and voice.

Panelists
Lariza Dugan Cuadra, Executive Director, CARECEN SF
Rashad Robinson, Executive Director, Color of Change
Abdi Soltani, Executive Director, ACLU of Northern California
Tom Steyer, Founder and President, NextGen Climate

Moderated by Mina Kim, Anchor and Host, KQED

Watch the video of this session:


A Place to Call Home

November 1, 2016

The Bay Area is in the midst of an unprecedented housing crisis. The way that we deal with this crisis will have repercussions for generations to come. Across the Bay Area, everyone is feeling the effects, but none more than the 1 million working families – predominantly people of color – that live below the poverty line. Without significant coordinated intervention, the housing crisis threatens to displace over 1.5 million people in the Bay Area, and erode the diversity, cultural vitality, and spirit that make the Bay Area a successful, prosperous, and resilient region.

Despite the obvious challenges, there is growing awareness among elected officials, policy makers, business leaders, and the general public of the magnitude of the region’s housing crisis, and we have seen significant willingness among all these groups to take action.

In this forum, we heard from housing experts and advocates, developers and community leaders about how to ensure that all residents in the Bay Area have a safe, affordable place to call home.

Panelists
Xavier de Souza Briggs, Vice President, Economic Opportunity & Markets, Ford Foundation
Gloria Bruce, Executive Director, East Bay Housing Organizations
Tony Salazar, President, West Coast Operations, McCormack Baron Salazar

Tomiquia Moss, Chief of Staff, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf

Moderated by Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, KQED’s Truth Be Told; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Watch the video of this session:


The Future of Work

September 14, 2016

2016Sept14_CWCEvent_Promotion_SocialMedia_Final_Group

As the economy has improved across the Bay Area, not everyone has benefitted equally from economic gains and job growth. In fact, many haven’t benefitted at all.

While there is seemingly no shortage of high-paying jobs for workers with advanced degrees and a surplus of low wage jobs with little hope for advancement, there simply are not enough jobs that pay a wage that provide safety, security, and hope for a better future.

In this session, we will bring together leaders from the advocacy community and the business world to talk about what it will take to create good jobs that allow people to make a meaningful contribution to their community and the local economy, and to build a better life for their kids.

Panelists
Orson Aguilar, President, Greenlining Institute
Carmen Rojas, CEO, Workers Lab
Jim Wunderman, President and CEO, Bay Area Council
Tim O’Reilly, Founder, O’Reilly Media

Moderated by Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, Rockit Fuel Radio Podcast; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Watch the video of this session:

Watch the highlights of the panel here.


Is the Rising Tide Lifting All Boats?

July 12, 2016

2016July12_CWCEvent_Promotion_SocialMedia_R2-Group

The Bay Area is at a crossroads. We live in one of the most industrious, exciting places anywhere. We know that our vitality, ingenuity and broad array of cultural identities make the region special. Yet we also know that we have significant challenges. People are worried about jobs, housing, transportation, and about making sure that everybody has the chance to participate, prosper and reach their full potential, regardless of their race or the neighborhood in which they live.

Is it possible to provide true opportunity for all residents of our region, or is the notion of Bay Area exceptionalism just a myth?

Panelists
Libby Schaaf, Mayor of Oakland
James Bell, Civil Rights Leader; Executive Director, W. Hayward Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice, Fairness and Equality
Manuel Pastor, Demographer and Professor of Sociology, American Studies and Ethnicity, The University of Southern California

Moderated by Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, Rockit Fuel Radio Podcast; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Watch the video of this session:

Watch the highlights of the panel here.

 

Categories

Leave a Reply